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. >>> and kim lawton on a group trying to document every house of worship in new york city, block by block. >> major funding for "religion and ethics weekly" is profounded by lilian, dedicated to the founders' interest in religion and education. additional funding also provided by mutual of america. designing customized individual and group retirement products. that's why we're your retirement company. and the corporation for public broadcasting. >> welcom i'm bob abeeth it's good to have you with us. anticipation is growing over the selection of the next pope, following pope benedict xvi's surprise announcement that he is retiring. at one of his final public appearances, benedict asked for prayers for himself and his successor. he then entered a week long retreat amid wide speculation that the papal conclave might begin before march 15th, giving the cardinals more time to select the next pope before holy week. meanwhile, some american catholics are demanding cardinal roger mahony not attend the conclave because of his role in the clergy sex abuse crisis. recently released documents show t
-- implement a public finance system based on new york city. it works well in new york city. it will work well in new york state. >> do you think he's serious? >> i do think he's serious. >> how will he prove he's serious? >> well, he'll prove his seriousnessy getting this bill paed in the ming legislature. i think we can have confidence that the governor will be able to pass something that is called campaign finance reform in this state. the real test and measure is going to be whether it includes this citizen funding. >> how would public funding work? >> well, it can work a lot of different ways. for obvious reasons it's most useful to point to new york city when you're in new york state. here we have a system in the city if you're running for citywide office or for city council, any contribution up to, you qualify to get into the systemyou ect to be in the system, it's voluntary. then any contribution up to $175 is matched six to one -- >> by the public? >> by the public. out of a pool from the general fund from the budget. and that has had a dramatic transformative effect in the way that f
,500 troops. they've been in mali for four weeks fighting against islamic extremists. in mexico city, rescue workers kept up their search for survivors of an explosion at the offices of mexico's state-run oil company. the blast happened late yesterday, killing at least 33 people and wounding 121 others. rescue workers dug through the rubble of the basement and first three floors of the building ere about 2 people worked. e causof t blast is still unknown and authorities are investigating. the retired cardinal of los angeles, roger mahony, was relieved of all his public duties today by his successor. it came as the diocese released thousands of previously secret documents showing he shielded priests who sexually abused children decades ago. the public censure was unparalleled in the american catholic church. mahony will still be able to celebrate mass and can vote for pope until he turns 80, two years from now. u.s. secretary of energy stephen chu announced today he's stepping dn. during his tenure, he came under fire for the handling of a solar energy loan to solyndra. it later went bankrupt
fell on the city of chelyabinsk-- population over a million-- about a thousand miles due west of moscow on the edge of the ural mountains. the strike shocked and stunned the world. more than 1,000 people were injured. paul davies of independent television news begins our coverage. >> rorter: emerging from the russian sky, a giant ball of flame, a meteorite providing a spectacular show until it suddenly explodes 30 miles above the earth. the city of chelyabinsk was unlucky to be beneath the meteorites flight path and was showered with debris dropping from the sky. thousands of windows were smashed, shocked workers evacuated their offices. this school class is about to be interrupted by the shock wave. here the windows come crashing in, and a national judo squad runs for cover. canadian ice hockey star michael garnett plays for the chelyabinsk team and lives in the city. i was awakened by this loud bang, crash and shaking in my apartment that, you know, literally shook me out of bed. i kind of gathered myself and looked out the window and i saw this giant streak across the sky that was th
here in new york city and is a fellow at the roosevelt institute. susan crawford, welcome. >> thank you so much. >> "captive audience?" who's the captive? >> us, all of us. what's happened is that these enormous telecommunications companies, comcast and time warner on the wired side, verizon and at&t on the wireless side, have divided up markets, put themselves in the position where they're subject to no competition and no oversight from any regulatory authority. and they're charging us a lot for internet access and giving us second class access. this is a lot like the elecifation story from the beginng othe 20th ctury. initially electricity was viewed as a luxury. so when f.d.r. came in, 90% of farms didn't have electricity in america at the same time that kids in new york city were playing with electric toys. and f.d.r. understood how important it was for people all over america to have the dignity and self-respect and sort of cultural and social and economic connection of an electrical outlet in thr home. so he made sure to take on the special interests that were controlling electric
at gun shows. that dpebt is now spreading well beyond washington as cities and states take steps to distance themselves from gun manufacturers. in new york last week, the city school teachers pension fund sold off $13.5 million it held in stock with five gun makers. that followed action in california where the state teachers retirement system also stripped itself of $11.7 million of investments from three gun manufacturers. and the golden state's $254 billion public employees retirement system is also deciding whether to withdraw the $5 million worth of shares it holds in two companies. in chicago, mayor rahm emmanuel focused on banks, asking t.d. bank and bank of america to stop financing gun manufacturers. chicago's gun violence has placed it in the center of the national debate. michelle obama attended the funeral of hadiya pendleton who was shot to death near her school days after marching in the presidential inaugural parade and pendleton's parents joined mrs. obama as her guest at the state of the union speech last week. president obama returned to his hometown last week to
something. >> ifill: the president took that message to minneapolis, a city that's already imposed stricter background checks on gun buyers. the white house plan calls for those checks, a renewed ban on assault-style weapons and limits on high-capacity magazines for ammunition. >> the only way we can reduce gun violence in this country is if the american people decide it's important. if you decide it's important. if parents and teachers, police officers and pastors, hunters and sportsmen, americans of every background stand up and say, "this time it's got to be different." >> ifill: the obama administration has been working to build on public outrage sparked by the mass shooting in newtown connecticut that left 20 children and six adults dead. ♪ for purple mountain majesty ♪ above... >> ifill: echos of that crime were still in the air last night at the super bowl where the sandy hook elementary school chorus sang "america the beautiful" before kick-off. and a super bowl ad paid for by mayors against illegal guns, a gun-control group, financed by new york mayor michael bloomberg, appeale
in the ancient city. a balloon carrying 21 people crashed into a field. 19 people died. a witness told nhk a fire broke out and burned half of the balloon's basket. he says he saw the pilot and a passenger jump out. he says the balloon rose higher as the flames spread. then it crashed into a sugar cane field. civil aviation minister wai al madawi visited the site of the accident. he says a committee from the ministry will investigate. luxor provincial officials say four japanese are among the dead. a japanese travel agency confirmed they're two married couples from tokyo. the casualties also include touris from britain and hong kong. >> translator: the basket of the doomed balloon was engulfed in flames within seconds. >> luxor is located about 500 kilometers south of cairo. it's one of egypt's most popular sightseeing areas. the city has ancient ruins such as the valley of the kings and the karnak temple along the nile river. the head of the travel agency in cairo points out that severe competition among balon operators for a diminishi nuer o touristsay he contributed to the incident. >> transla
of southeast asia keeps growing, more people are flying from city to city in the region. atr is training pilots right in asia. the french-italian company hopes it will urge companies to buy its turbo prop planes. a japanese airline that shuttles between regionalities has cided to start using tee of the propeller planes. >> at the beginning of the operation in japan with atr, we are confident that we can be successful. >> higher fuel prices are propelling changes to regional air travel. nhk world, paris. >>> people in norlt north western japan are used to dealing with wintry conditions. this time they're finding themselves under. >> the snowfall has reached record breaking levels. it's already at 502 centimeters which is the record so far this timef year. this is accompanied with gusts of 90 kilometers were hour. both combined are bringing blizzard conditions. the bad news is that the accumulation is going to be some staggering amount in the next 24 hours due to the additional snowfall of another 60 centimeters. another 60 centimeters will likely to bring more record breaking amounts. the winds
, "after newtown" wraps up tonight with a report from chicago on the public health crisis in the city in the wake of rising gun violence. >> the people who come in after having been shot are some of the highest risk folks. these are people who have been shot, who may have been shot before, and really without some intervention, without some life- changing moment, the trajectory's either going to be jail or death. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> suarez: and, as a magistrate grants oscar pistorius bail, we talk to charlayne hunter gault about how his arrest has focused attention on the unusually high rate of violence against women in south africa. >> domestic violence is shot through the entire society from the highest of the highed in socioeconomic terms to the lowest of the low. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100
of the capital, a smoke rose over the city as government forces fought back with artillery. they're trying to hold the core of the city, the main stronghold for president bashar al-assad. in northern mali, french ground troops battled islamist rebels overnight, outside the city of gao. it was new evidence that while the french have retaken key cities, the insurgents have not yet been routed from the countryside. meanwhile, french and malian soldiers found caches of industrial-strength explosives and makeshift bomb labs. the rebels had hidden them outside gao. u.s. investigators said today they are not ready to rule that lithium ion batteries used in boeing's 787 dreamliners are inherently unsafe for aviation. instead, the national transportation safety board said manufacturers need to build in better safeguards. at the same time, the board said investigators are still weeks away from determining what caused a battery fire on a japan airlines dreamliner in boston. in the meantime, all 50 of the planes in service, remain grounded. budget battle cries echoed up and down pennsylvania avenue in
have grown up in the city's roughest neighborhoods where they have already developed an inner strength remarkable for their age. >>ften times those skill sets are not point pointed as assets. often times kids think that they walk into this environment with liabilities. we think it's completely opposite. >> reporter: once the students move on to college they stay in regular contact with their one goal teacher through their first year. the aim is not just to get kids into college but to equip them with the support system they need to finish. >> we've seen 20, 25 years of education reform in the united states. almost all of it has been directed in prek through 12 which has -- so we see that proliferation of charter schools we've seen early childhood interventions work, we've seen human capital providers, we've seen big city mayors like rahm emanuel take over education yet almost none of it has spread to higher education. so our country has begun to get college access right but we see huge dropout rates in college. >> reporter: cynthia barren is a coach with the university of illinois at c
city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: madeleine albright is here. she was secretary of sta fro 1997 to001. her approach to american foreign policy was marked by a muscular commitment to the ideal of democracy. her story began in far away lands, she was born in czechoslovakia before the start of world war ii. she looks back at her childhood in her latest book called "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war." the paper back version is just out. i am pleased to have her on this program. welcome. >> wonderful to visit you. thank you. >> rose: you told me about this wonderful organization that you have started which is called -- which is all about the former foreign ministers around the world. >> it's sponsored by aspin, it's the aspin foreign ministers forum we its unofficial name is madeleine and her exes. >> rose: (laughs) >> and we meet a couple times a year talk and share a lot of experience. i have a business, i have a global consulting firm and i teach at georgetown and i'm chairman of the board of the national democratic institute which is something that was started i
, when he joined the obama administration. during his tenure, he invested in a citi fund that was registered in the cayman islands, well known as an offshore tax haven. republicans pressed lew on the issue at his senate confirmation hearing today. >> my benefit was really very small in the sense that i took a loss when i sold the investment. i always reported all income. i always paid any taxes that were due. i very strongly believe that we should have tax policies that make it difficult, if not impossible, to shelter income from taxation. >> sreenivasan: lew is expected to win confirmation in the full senate. that vote could come late this month. the obama administration is now calling for congress to close gaps in the nation's cyber- security. the president signed an executive order on tuesday, increasing government efforts to share information on threat it also urges voluntary efforts by industry. congress has struggled to reach consensus on the issue due to legal and privacy questions. this was a mixed day on wall street, as stocks searched for direction. the dow jone
,000 jurisdictions that are covered, that's all states, municipalities, counties, city governments, in the last ten years there have only been 37 objections. in fact, today chief justice asked the solicitor general in 2005 the year before renewal how many submissions were made of voting changes? 3,700. how many objections were made? just one. the point of that is there is no longer systematic widespread discrimination and the record that congress established did not show that. >> woodruff: sherrilyn? >> that's too narrow a vision of what section 5 does. objections are when the community or jurisdiction proposes a plan, the justice department reviews it and determines that that plan is going to discriminate against minority voters. but there are other things that happen as well. sometimes the jurisdiction submits a plan, the justice department says "we think this plan is problematic, give us more information." and the jurisdiction at that point will decide to withdraw the plan. there are over 800 instances in the period that congress studied in which a jurisdiction did precisely that. >> woodruff: s
. besides mardi gras, it's also still riding high from hosting the super bowl. the city's tourism officials say one million people are in town for the festivities. now, that's more than five times as many people who showed up for the super bowl. new orleans' economy took a big hit when hurricane katrina struck in 2005, but these big turnouts are helping its economic comeback. >> tourism is our most important industry. it's a $5 billion industry for new orleans. it employs 75,000 of our local citizens, so it is absolutely critical that we continue to do events like mardi gras, super bowls, final fours, big conventions, business meetings. that is the lifeblood of the city. >> susie: she also says this year's mardi gras is expected to bring in almost $150 million and that the planning never stops. tomorrow, new orleans will start working on mardi gras 2014. well, that's "nightly business report" for tuesday, february 12. have a great evening, everyone. we'll see you online at www.nbr.com and back here tomorrow night. captioning sponsored by wpbt captioned by media access group at wgbh access.w
should follow the example of a new york city nurse named menchu sanchez. when hurricane sandy plunged her hospital into darkness she wasn't thinking about how her own home was faring. her mind was on the 20 precious newborns in her care and the rescue plan she devised that kept them all safe. we should follow the example of a north miami woman named desaline victor. when she arrived at her polling place she was told the wait to vote might be six hours. and as time ticked by, her concern was not with her tired body or aching feet or whether folks like her would get to have their say. hour after hour a throng of people stayed in line to support her because desiline is 102 years old. they erupted in cheers when she finally put on a sticker that read, "i voted." ( applause ) there's desiline. we should follow the example of a police officer named brian murphy. when a gunman opened fire on a siek temple in wisconsin, brian was the first to arrive. he did not consider his own safety. he fought back until help arrived and ordered his fellow officers to protect the safety of the fellow americans
continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with a look at the crises in syria. nearly 70,000 people have died in one of the most deadly civil wars in recent history. two years in and the community has debated how to intervene. the united states hasiven nearly $400 million in humanitarian aid. he's remained fragmented and disorganized. as the violence skates the united states has increasing efforts to arm the groups. joining me is michael gordon the chief military correspondent for the "new york times." i'm please to do have him on this program. welcome. >> nice to be here. >> much to talk about. let me begin with syria. we all know from congressional testimony from leon panetta the former sect of defense and others that there was a recommendation from leon panetta and from david petraeus at ci and from hillary clinton at state to do something. >> so what happened, i believe, and i did a lot of reporting on it. and actually it was an article that i worked on with mark rangler that was the basis
, tokyo. >>> vietnamese who live in rural areas are starting to see the effects of the city on their daily lives. urban pollution is spreading to the countryside, and it's affecting their health. but some japanese businesspeople have stepped in to help. nhk world has more from hanoi. >> reporter: vietnam's economy is racing ahead. but not everybody is moving forward. hanoi is crowded with motorbikes. across the country, people work with circumstances in the environment. this river running through tepco is dangerous. the environment readings are four times higher than recommended by the government. people living downstream are suffering the consequences. juan and his wife were born and raised in this village. they are farmers who survive by growing rice and other crops. the day is spent walking in the rice paddies. >> translator: the watery fill my paddies with is black. my legs itch from working in the rice fields. water shouldn't be black, but i have no choice but to use that terrible water for farming. >> reporter: there are many such worries about pollution. a new deal originating in ja
to making different kinds of product. sabae, a city in western japan, makes 95% of japan's eyewear. but sales have dropped 30% since their peak in the '90s. that's because customers have been buying more eyewear produc from chinese coanies. their prices are lower. >> translator: in a few years, sabae could become the hub for making medical equipment. i hope that our products will help many doctors around the world. >> reporter: already the firm is gearing up to make those sales. and if competitors get on the bandwagon, a straggling industry may get a fresh start. nhk world, sabae. >>> the japanese government has been struggling to designate final disposal sites for radioactive waste generated by the fukushima radioactive accident. they oppose the idea of contaminated materials on their territory. now government officials said they'll rethink the way they select the storage sites. the environment ministry plans to ask each prefecture to dispose of contaminated mud and ash from incinerators on its territory. it's hoping to build new disposal sites in five prefectures. they have desig
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> steven brill is here, he wrote the cover story of this week's "time" magazine. it is called bitter pill, why medical bills are killing us. it is the longest piece by a single author ever published by time. it took brill seven months to research and write. he analyzes bills from hospitals, doctors an drug companies to paint an extraordinary picture of medical overspendingment i'm pleased to have stef steven brill back at this table, welcome. >> thanks, charlie. >> rose: what got you here this longest piece. >> as you know i like t pick topics where i just feel that i'm curious about them. and for a long time i have just been curious about why health-care costs so much. you know, we've had years of debate about who should pay for health care. how should we do insurance, and who should pay the bills. but i've never seen anyone stop to say hey, wait a minute, how come if will cost you 20 or 25,000 dollars if god-- as you're walking ot of this building, you slip-and-fall and land on your elbow. whwill it cost a million
and what to do about it." he's now a visiting professor at the new school here in new york city where he's teaching a special course on the financial crash. welcome, richard wolff. >> thank you, bill. >> last night i watched for the second time the popular lecture that is on this dvd, "capitalism hits the fan." tell us why you say capitalism has hit the fan. >> well, the classic defense of capitalism as a system for much of its history has been, okay, it has this or that flaw. but it "delivers the goods." >> yeah, for most everybody. >> right. >> that was the argument. >> and so you may not get the most, but it'll trickle down to you, all the different ways. >> the yachts will rise. >> that's right. the ocean will lift all the boats. the reality is that for at least 30 years now, that isn't true. for the majority of people, capitalism is not delivering the goods. it is delivering, arguably, the bads. and so we have this disparity getting wider and wider between those for whom capitalism continues to deliver the goods by all means, but a growing majority in this society which isn't gettin
power, and kansas city declared an emergency. the storm had already battered the texas panhandle. winds there reached hurricane force, and piled drifts more than two feet high in some places. negotiations on iran's nuclear program restarted today for the first time in eight months. the two-day talks opened in kazakhstan. the u.s. and other world powers offered to ease some international sanctions, if iran will limit activities that could lead to nuclear weapons. . >> it addresses international concerns on the exclusively peaceful nature of the iranian nuclear program but it's also responsive to iranian ideas. we hope very much that iran will seize this opportunity and come to the talks with flexibility and a commitment to make concrete progress toward building steps. >> sreenivasan: in response, iran said it will make a counter-offer during the talks. in egypt, at least 19 people were killed in one of the deadliest ballooning accidents ever. a hot air balloon carrying touris caught fire over the ancient city of luxor and crashed in a field. the dead were from europe and asia. in additio
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we ve spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higr education. the simple fact that the more education you'v
was provided by the following: captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. . >> rose: tom donilon is here, he is the president's national security advisor. part of his job is to prepare and deliver the presidential daily brief on national security. joe biden has called him the most important person in the mix this week in the vice president spoke about foreign policy challenges at the munish security conference. >> we have made it clear at the outset that we would not-- we would be prepared to me bilaterally with the irani leadership. we would not make it a secret that we were doing that. we would let our partners know if that occasion presented itself. that offer stands. nearly all of our partners and allies are convinced that president assad is a tyrant, hell-bent on clinging to power, is no longer fit to lead the syrian people and he must go. >> as well as syria and iran the united states faces new challenges from islammix extremism in african, yet it is not clear they are ready to stand on their own by 2014 when u.s. troops are sch
, part of the city's celebrity series, at the beginning of just their second-ever visit to the u.s. backstage, musicians aged 15 to 36 warmed up and chatted in a variety of languages. >> no, no, no! >> brown: at rehearsal, barenboim was a tough taskmaster... >> you see how much more space you have for a crescendo? please don't play mechanically. >> brown: ...cajoling his young musicians. >> you're just playing comfortably without any idea of thought. ya-ba-ba-ba. what is that? >> brown: i watched the rehearsal, and you were pretty tough on them at various points. you kept saying, "you're playing too comfortably." what does that mean? >> it means that to make music, to express music, you cannot adopt the line of least resistance. you have to adopt the line of most resistance. music is not politically correct. music demands total concentration and the perfect, perfect matrimony between thought, feeling, and gut. >> brown: so how? >> and people who think it's easy should choose another profession. >> brown: uncompromising in his music, barenboim is also uncompromising in his politic
which made a mockery of citi credit policy. >> if you take an organization like citigroup, for example-- people involved in due diligence like richard bowen signaled up the line all the way up to robert rubin that something was wrong, that they were finding that some 60% of mortgages they were buying weren't meeting their standards. mr. bowen sent you an e-mail. >> narrator: in one exchange, the commission asked citibank's robert rubin to respond to bowen's e-mail. >> did you ever act on that? >> mr. chairman, i do recollect this and that either i or somebody else-- and i truly do not remember who-- but either i or somebody else sent it to the appropriate people. >> narrator: rubin told angelides that actions were taken to improve the bank's due diligence operations. but his recollections were vague. >> i certainly don't remember today whether i knew at the time or not. i truly don't. >> if the excuse at the top was, "we didn't know," that's a prty pr exse fm pele who are hauling down $10 million, $20 million, $30 million, or, in robert rubin's case, $115 million. >> narrator: bowen wa
rallies, dances and vigils in dozens of major cities. the events were held to coincide with valentine's day. the united nations has estimated that one of every three women worldwide, is raped or beaten in the course of a lifetime. a long-time leader in american a new implantable device that restores some vision in the blind won approval today in the united states. the food and drug administration agreed to allow use of the argus 2 retinal prosthesis. it uses electrodes in the retina that receives signals from a wireless camera on a pair of glasses. initially the device will help small numbers, but it may ultimately treat vision disorders in millions. a long-time leader in american foods-- heinz is being sold to a group that includes warren buffett. the $23.3 billion deal announced today will make heinz a privately held company. on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost nine points to close at 13,973. the nasdaq rose a point to close at 3,198. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: there were more hurdles today for president obama's se
on an assembly line making cigarettes. in fact, i once talked to a man in one of the cigarette-producing cities. he said, you know, i've come to believe that even the machine that turns out those little white things is evil. i think you've got to recognize that if we suddenly ran on tobacco tomorrow as something we didn't know anything about before, there would be no doubt about the fact it would be treated the way we treat toxic wastes or other things that threaten the health of our people. >> sreenivasan: he left office in 1989, and later founded an institute at dartmouth in hanover to teach basic values and ethics to medical students. c. everett koop was 96 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: next, a big story on the big price gs attached to medical care. steven brill spent months reporting his 26,000-word cover story in the latest issue of "time" magazine looking at what's behind our country's high-cost of health care. what he found was startling: a few days of lab work that costs more than a car; a trip to an emergency room for indigestion
Search Results 0 to 40 of about 41 (some duplicates have been removed)